Growing Up At Christmas: Mastering Parent Duties During Your Child’s Pre-Teen Transition

Elf on a Shelf Fun for all ages, specially tweens!

Credit: You can still make it a Christmas to remember

 

The pre-teen years are notoriously difficult to get right at Christmas. Your son or daughter’s interests can change massively between summer and winter. This is especially if this was the year that they graduated to middle school. Unfortunately, the days of Barbie dolls and cartoons are fading fast.   

 

This transitional period is the perfect time to help your child grow up as they edge ever closer to their teenage years. Here are just five killer ideas that will work wonders throughout the festive period.

 

Buy a grown up gift. Given that the days of childish toys are evaporating, why not treat them to something more grown up. Personalized name necklaces are a particularly good option for girls while boys may be better suited to bracelets. Choose a present that they can enjoy for many years to come and highlights your love as a parent. If nothing else, that ability to let them feel that they are growing up is sure to generate smiles. What else could you want from those gifts?

 

Teach them responsibility. If kids want to grow up, they should learn to act in a mature manner. You still want to do it in a loving way that will spark excitement. A pet can transform your family dynamic forever. The choice between a cat, dog, or something else will hinge on personal circumstances. As long as you have the time and resources to take suitable care, though, this can be the greatest gift for your entire household.

 

Encourage appreciation. As children reach this stage of their development, they should also gain a sense of perspective. They won’t always get what they want, but they are far better off than a lot of kids. The festive period is a great time to give back and, while it shouldn’t impact your Christmas Day, it’s a vital aspect of the holidays. Hopefully, you thought about this before Thanksgiving too. Even if you didn’t, it’s not too late to get involved. The satisfaction and warmth gained from helping others are truly wonderful.

 

Let them take charge. This period of your child’s life should also encourage them to learn the value of money. Putting them in charge of their gifts by setting a budget and letting them buy what they want can do this in style. Better still, you know that they will be left with presents that they actively want. Combine this with a small surprise gift to create that December 25th magic, and you’ll be sure to gain a winning outcome.

 

Get them involved. Christmas is a time that should be spent with family. Do this in a productive manner by getting your child to help out with simple aspects of the dinner. Doing this will emphasize that sentiment like never before. Apart from spending time together, they’ll be starting to learn the basics of important life skills. If nothing else, the positive reactions gained are sure to fill your child with a sense of pride. Achieve this, and things won’t go far wrong.

 

Job done.

 

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Comments

  1. Melissa Storms says:

    These are good, solid tips. My son is 13 and I think the tips hold true for the young teen years also. It is such a tough time in so many ways. If we can help our children to get involved with all aspects of the holiday I think they enjoy it more.

  2. ellen beck says:

    Christmas during teen years can be tough. They of course dont believe that the gifts come down the chimney, they are fully aware their parents are providing it. When mine turned into a teen (a bit after) we concentrated more on ways to give to others. To expect less, give more.

  3. Oh, those hormonal, middle school years! They were definitely challenging. My daughter still wanted to believe in Santa but my older son spilled the beans.

  4. Amber Ludwig says:

    I love this!! It can be a hard time especially when the belief in Santa goes away!! I plan to have my son and I do charity and donation work around the holidays when he is older!

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